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  • Writer's pictureSpeak Your Roots

Wang Bam Im and Wang Kushu




Wang bam im


Kine ki kyntien ki thew ïa ki briew kiba jemnud than eh haduh ba kiwei pat ki shim kabu ïa ki namar ba kim kheiñ briew shuh ïa ki. Kine ki jait briew ki ïa syriem ïa ka jait wang kaba lada shet ruh long bad lada bam im ruh kam buid satia. Kiwei pat ki wang hap ban da shet shuwa ban bam bad lada bakla shet ruh ki pynbuid ïa ka shyntur baroh kawei.


This phrase symbolically refers to people who are too gentle and gullible to the point that people take advantage of them and completely disregard them. People with these qualities are likened to a type of "wang" plant called "Wang bam im" which can easily be cooked or eaten raw too, without causing any itching in the throat. In general, "wang" has to be cooked properly so that it does not cause any itching. On the other hand, there are other kinds of "wang" which even after being cooked properly still cause an itchy throat.



Wang kushu


Kine ki kyntien ki thew ïa ki briew ki bym ju hun, kiba thut biej wat ïa i daw barit eh ruh. Kine ki jait briew ki ïa syriem ïa ka jait wang khlaw kaba buid hi lada shet makna katno katno ruh.


This phrase symbolically refers to people who are never content or satisfied; who become irritated or annoyed with the slightest reason. People with these qualities are likened to a wild variety of the "wang" plant called "wang kushu" which causes an itch in the throat even if it is cooked well. Thus, just like the plant, no matter how much anyone does, what they do is not going to be enough.



From what we have read, "Ka Wang" may be categorised as Taro stems which are the young leaf stalks of the Taro plant. The Taro stems in the pictures are similar to what we call in Khasi as "ka wangpanai". The plant known for its starchy tuber has much to offer in its edible shoots, stems and leaves. The stems are typically from the young, new-growth leaves. Among the Southeast Asian cultures, the young, as-yet unrolled leaves and stems are cooked in vegetable dishes or soups.
Taro stems are fibrous, so they are peeled prior to cooking. The tough outer layer is removed to reveal a more tender stalk within. Just like the leaves and corms, the stems contain an irritant called calcium oxalate, which can cause itchiness and swelling in the mouth and throat. Cooking the stems can remove the effect.
If there any ethno-botanists please tell us more! 🌿🌿

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